ANTHOLOGY

turn the pageABF

2013

online from

1st to 30th April

During 2021 the turn the page ABF website will be transformed into an online platform to show the work of all the wonderful artists that have participated in the event since it's launch at The Forum, Norwich in 2012.

Each month we will feature a rolling showcase of images from our amazing exhibiting artists, alongside photo's and short film clips from some of our live performers, workshops and events.

 

Please click on the artists images below to find out more about their work or follow the 'walking man' to hear about our monthly Symposium presentations.

Click here for details of our 2021 Artists Book Competition.

  

2013 Participating Artists

Please note that the text featured alongside these images has been copied from the 2013 catalogue. If you would like to get in touch with a particular artist, please contact us and we will forward your message where possible.

Focus on...

Nicola Dale

Nicola Dale, A Secret Heliotropism, hand cut found book (320 pages), measuring 23.5 x 30 cm closed and 123 x 30 cm open (approx).

Emma Lloyd

Emma Lloyd at ttp2013 @The Forum, Norwich

Emma Lloyd dissects, reforms and translates language, pushing it beyond its constraints and reconfigures it, challenging it's structural boundaries.

Through installation, sculpture and printmaking, Emma explores the cognitive properties of sight, the shifts between looking and reading, questioning not only what we see but how we interpret it.

Emma's 2019 exhibition “Beyond the Linear” at Salford Museum and Art Gallery explored language, visual puzzles and cognitive properties, where the artist exposes subtleties in our exchanges and probes the nature of communication itself.

 

Exploring the cognitive properties of sight through a series of visual puzzles; Lloyd identifies the shift between looking and reading. Content and form merge to complicate and acknowledge language’s accessibility.

The diverse range of media used invited the viewer to explore the connotations of materials and their ability to shape narrative. Lloyd believes matter to be integral to artistic process since it has the capacity to connect with prior experiences. Such triggers are considered when she examines the impact of the contemporary digital landscape and its effect on us as tactile beings.

In an age of marked polarisation and renewed discourse regarding the nature of content and dialogue’s authenticity, Lloyd believes it crucial to investigate the fundamentals of communication. Through this we gain a deeper, more critical insight into how our understanding is shaped and disseminated.

Images from the exhibition can be seen via this link: https://www.beesblogs.co.uk/emma-lloyd-beyond-the-linear/

The Norfolk Longbook Project

The Norfolk Longbook is a hand-made celebration of the county, in the words and pictures of

people who love and are inspired by it.

The aim of the project is to create the longest book in Norfolk and it will, almost certainly be the

only 'social history' book of its kind in the UK.

The book is an expanding concertina that currently measures 17 metres long when fully open, glistening with images of Norfolk skies, beach-huts, seascapes and churches, created by around 160 people to date.

How to be a part of the

Norfolk Longbook project

When it is completed, around 300 people will have become part of its story.

Pages of prints and poems, textiles and tokens/keepsakes, showing buildings, boats, reed beds and farmland are being bound into the book.

 

The book is a compendium not only of beautiful images of Norfolk, but also of its history and characters, and celebrates traditional craft skills such as painting, printing, book-binding, woodcarving, calligraphy and fiber arts. 

All of the pages are hand-made, drawn or painted and combines pieces by established artists with the work of people who might never before have made a piece of art.

As a social history project the aim is to incorporate as many aspects of Norfolk as possible and everyone has the chance to participate.

Stories about farming and fishing, memories passed down through the generations and accounts of local traditions and dialect, and wartime heroism, alongside imagery of Norfolk.

To date, current pieces include a textile picture of Booton Church by Heather Tilley, a Norfolk landscape print by Laurie RudlingA lovely page written by calligraphist Jane Knights, of a Norfolk dialect poem by John Kett,” she said. Lisa Little, descended from generations of Sheringham fishermen, has contributed a lino-cut print of a boat, and members of the Palgrave Society – a traditional Norfolk surname - hope to contribute a page showing their coat of arms.

The front cover of the book hand carved from tulip wood by Ernie Allen, echoes a design taken from a Viking longboat, and links the book back through a millennium of Norfolk history. 

(text from article by Rowan Mantle)